"I follow the general fashion in ordinary manners and moral laws in serious matters, but in art I follow myself. Therefore I won’t do anything I don’t want to do. Even if something is unnatural and I like it, I’ll do it. I don’t particularly approve of myself for this, and I know it isn’t reasonable; nonetheless, there it is. From this comes my individuality—and this is most important to me… Although I may seem the same to other people, to me each thing I produce is a new expression, and I always make each work from a new interest. It’s like a painter who always paints the same rose… Rather than tell a superficial story, I wanted to go deeper, to show the hidden undercurrents, the ever-changing uncertainties of life. So instead of constantly pushing dramatic action to the fore, I left empty spaces, so viewers could have a pleasant aftertaste to savor."

Yasujiro Ozu
December 12, 1903 — December 12, 1963

Mother and Son — dir. Alexander Sokurov


"I’m taking a gamble making the film. I don’t have any money. I just go to the bank and borrow it. And hope. But what isn’t risky about movies? It’s always risky when it’s original… It’s a very dangerous territory to be in where you can only make a film if your grosses reflect a large gross. I’ve been making films for twenty-five years and none of them has really made a lot of money. But there’s nobody in the world who can tell me we didn’t succeed. And that’s the greatest feeling that I’ve ever had in my life.”
John CassavetesDecember 9, 1929 — February 3, 1989

"I’m taking a gamble making the film. I don’t have any money. I just go to the bank and borrow it. And hope. But what isn’t risky about movies? It’s always risky when it’s original… It’s a very dangerous territory to be in where you can only make a film if your grosses reflect a large gross. I’ve been making films for twenty-five years and none of them has really made a lot of money. But there’s nobody in the world who can tell me we didn’t succeed. And that’s the greatest feeling that I’ve ever had in my life.”

John Cassavetes
December 9, 1929 — February 3, 1989

"I once had a dream, or a vision, and I imagined that dream to be of importance to other people, so I wrote the manuscript and made the film. But it is not until the moment when my dream meets with your emotions and your minds that my shadows come to life. It is your recognition that brings them to life. It is your indifference that kills them. I hope that you will understand; that you when you leave the cinema will take with you an experience or a sudden thought—or maybe a question. The efforts of my friends and myself have then not been in vain…" — Ingmar Bergman


"Sufficient time is rarely taken to study light. It is as important as the lines the actors speak, or the direction given to them. It is an integral part of the story and that is why such close coordination is needed between director and cinematographer. Light is a treasure chest: once properly understood, it can bring another dimension to the medium… As I worked with Ingmar, I learned how to express in light the words in the script, and make it reflect the nuances of the drama. Light became a passion which has dominated my life."
Sven NykvistDecember 3, 1922 — September 20, 2006

"Sufficient time is rarely taken to study light. It is as important as the lines the actors speak, or the direction given to them. It is an integral part of the story and that is why such close coordination is needed between director and cinematographer. Light is a treasure chest: once properly understood, it can bring another dimension to the medium… As I worked with Ingmar, I learned how to express in light the words in the script, and make it reflect the nuances of the drama. Light became a passion which has dominated my life."

Sven Nykvist
December 3, 1922 — September 20, 2006

"Like the great Hollywood stars, Tanaka rarely appears to be acting. But instead of presenting a fixed screen persona, she makes each of the disparate characters she embodies appear to be her natural self… she changes from film to film, and within films, ranging over the manifold possibilities that humans can choose or be chosen by. As a director she extends that range to the film as a whole, embracing eeriness and earthiness, ugliness and beauty, irony and passion. She is a variable star, now radiant, now somber, now (as she directs) invisible…"

"Tanaka can be called either the first or the second woman ever to direct movies in Japan… When Tanaka revealed her interest in directing, Mizoguchi—having worked with her on so many films sympathetic to women—opposed the move. Was he a sexist in feminist disguise? Apparently he felt that Tanaka, as the best screen actress in Japan, should not risk being less than the best as a director. In any case, other filmmakers were more helpful. Naruse took her on as an assistant director, Kinoshita wrote the script of her first film, Love Letters, and Ozu co-authored her second, The Moon Has Risen.”Film Comment

Kinuyo Tanaka
November 29, 1909 — March 21, 1977

heidisaman:

Dear Readers,
I’m getting personal on this post because I want to let you in on some news. In 2014, I’m directing my feature film and it’s called Namour.
It’s set in Los Angeles.  It’s about Steven Bassem, a young valet driver who can’t seem to get his act together. As his close-knit Arab American family starts to fall apart, Steven begins to act out the drama of his permanent adolescence in ways that surprise even him.
Namour is about the decisions we make when our responsibilities begin to weigh down our convictions — and why life can feel like it’s passing us by.

I’ve been looking for financing producers for quite a while now and it’s been a difficult process, most of which has to deal with investors wanting to change the tone and genre of the film to turn it into a more ‘palatable’ Arab representation. They’d like the film to be framed as an immigrant family piece (as well as a couple of other familiar genres — you can read about that here) instead of the subtle, mood piece that I’ve written it to be. 
Their comments convinced me that the only way to make my film the way I wanted to make it would be through truly independent means,  which is whyI’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise a portion of the funds myself — and I need your help. 
Help me prove those producers wrong. Let’s send the message that there is an audience for well-told, unique stories that feature people of color in dynamic and non-stereotypical roles. I will only receive the funds from this campaign if I reach my Kickstarter goal. So any amount you can give will get me that much closer to my goal.
I created my tumblr to talk about the films that I love and the writers, directors and cinematographers who create them.  Thanks to this blog I’ve discovered the wonderful camaraderie that exists around these films. It’s been a perfect surprise. 
Thank you for following along and for reading.
Heidi

heidisaman:

Dear Readers,

I’m getting personal on this post because I want to let you in on some news. In 2014, I’m directing my feature film and it’s called Namour.

It’s set in Los Angeles.  It’s about Steven Bassem, a young valet driver who can’t seem to get his act together. As his close-knit Arab American family starts to fall apart, Steven begins to act out the drama of his permanent adolescence in ways that surprise even him.

Namour is about the decisions we make when our responsibilities begin to weigh down our convictions — and why life can feel like it’s passing us by.

I’ve been looking for financing producers for quite a while now and it’s been a difficult process, most of which has to deal with investors wanting to change the tone and genre of the film to turn it into a more ‘palatable’ Arab representation. They’d like the film to be framed as an immigrant family piece (as well as a couple of other familiar genres — you can read about that here) instead of the subtle, mood piece that I’ve written it to be. 

Their comments convinced me that the only way to make my film the way I wanted to make it would be through truly independent means,  which is whyI’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise a portion of the funds myself — and I need your help. 

Help me prove those producers wrong. Let’s send the message that there is an audience for well-told, unique stories that feature people of color in dynamic and non-stereotypical roles. I will only receive the funds from this campaign if I reach my Kickstarter goal. So any amount you can give will get me that much closer to my goal.

I created my tumblr to talk about the films that I love and the writers, directors and cinematographers who create them.  Thanks to this blog I’ve discovered the wonderful camaraderie that exists around these films. It’s been a perfect surprise. 

Thank you for following along and for reading.

Heidi

11 / 28 / 2013 190   originally from mizoguchi   via heidisaman

Genius poster designer Waldemar Świerzy has passed away.

Nobody’s Daughter Haewon — dir. Hong Sang-soo

When filmmakers meet…