Child of Resistance — dir. Haile Gerima

Accattone was very important for me because it rarely happens that you get to witness the invention of a language: what Pasolini did was truly an invention because he had no significant experience of the cinema he could draw on. At the time, the only film he really liked was Dreyer’s Joan of Arc. It was only later that he began going to the movies more often. So, to repeat something I’ve said many times, the first day that Pasolini made a tracking shot, I had the feeling I was watching the first tracking shot in the history of film.” — Bernardo Bertolucci

Once, I asked Pier Paolo, “Which do you think is the most important of your films?” He answered, “Ninetto. Of all the films I’ve made, none is better or worse. I’m like a mother who has many children. They’re all my children. I can’t love one more than the others. I love them all the same way.” — Ninetto Davoli

O Sangue — dir. Pedro Costa

"When the protagonist turns the camera on himself, he realizes that one can only portray the world through oneself… I turn the camera on myself in all my films. Not all the time, perhaps, but often. But I do it in a way so nobody can see it." — Krzysztof Kieślowski

Kaïrat — dir. Darezhan Omirbaev


"I am a materialist; however, that doesn’t mean I deny the imagination, fantasy, or even that certain unexplainable things can exist. Rationally, I don’t believe a handless man can grow new hands, but I can act as though I believed it, because I’m interested in what comes afterwards. Besides, I am working in cinema, which is a machine that manufactures miracles. […] As inexplicable as the accidents that set it off, our imagination is a crucial privilege. I’ve tried my whole life simply to accept the images that present themselves to me without trying to analyze them… Some analysts—in despair, I suppose—have declared me ‘unanalyzable,’ as if I belonged to some other species or had come from another planet (which is always possible, of course). At my age, I let them say whatever they want. I still have my imagination, and in its impregnable innocence it will keep me going until the end of my days. All this compulsion to ‘understand’ everything fills me with horror. I love the unexpected more and more the older I get…"
Luis BuñuelFebruary 22, 1900 — July 29, 1983

"I am a materialist; however, that doesn’t mean I deny the imagination, fantasy, or even that certain unexplainable things can exist. Rationally, I don’t believe a handless man can grow new hands, but I can act as though I believed it, because I’m interested in what comes afterwards. Besides, I am working in cinema, which is a machine that manufactures miracles. […] As inexplicable as the accidents that set it off, our imagination is a crucial privilege. I’ve tried my whole life simply to accept the images that present themselves to me without trying to analyze them… Some analysts—in despair, I suppose—have declared me ‘unanalyzable,’ as if I belonged to some other species or had come from another planet (which is always possible, of course). At my age, I let them say whatever they want. I still have my imagination, and in its impregnable innocence it will keep me going until the end of my days. All this compulsion to ‘understand’ everything fills me with horror. I love the unexpected more and more the older I get…"

Luis Buñuel
February 22, 1900 — July 29, 1983


"It’s the doing that’s the important thing. I equate film-making with sandcastles. You get a bunch of mates together and go down to the beach and build a great sandcastle. You sit back and have a beer, the tide comes in, and in twenty minutes it’s just smooth sand. That structure you made is in everybody’s memories, and that’s it. You all start walking home, and someone says ‘Are you going to come back next Saturday and build another one?’ And another guy says, ‘Well, OK, but I’ll do moats this time, not turrets!’ But that, for me, is the real joy of it all, that it’s just fun, and nothing else… If I look back at all my work, it all seems like yesterday. I can’t imagine how all this time got away. All of it is basically the same; none of it comes from any brilliance. It comes from enthusiasm, a little bit of ego and tenacity. It’s been such a gift to do any of this."
Robert AltmanFebruary 20, 1925 — November 20, 2006

"It’s the doing that’s the important thing. I equate film-making with sandcastles. You get a bunch of mates together and go down to the beach and build a great sandcastle. You sit back and have a beer, the tide comes in, and in twenty minutes it’s just smooth sand. That structure you made is in everybody’s memories, and that’s it. You all start walking home, and someone says ‘Are you going to come back next Saturday and build another one?’ And another guy says, ‘Well, OK, but I’ll do moats this time, not turrets!’ But that, for me, is the real joy of it all, that it’s just fun, and nothing else… If I look back at all my work, it all seems like yesterday. I can’t imagine how all this time got away. All of it is basically the same; none of it comes from any brilliance. It comes from enthusiasm, a little bit of ego and tenacity. It’s been such a gift to do any of this."

Robert Altman
February 20, 1925 — November 20, 2006

"I never intentionally make ambiguous that which should be clear. Certainly, my understanding of film is that the story is an element of film, but it’s very much about portraying a reality, a world that exists beyond the screen. I think you would have to agree that our encounters with reality can sometimes be clear and unambiguous, but more often they are confoundingly complex, and the meaning of events that unfold before us can often elude comprehension forever. So, when I make my films, I am not the all-seeing, omniscient God explaining to you in the audience what has happened and why. You should just think of my movies as a string of scenes of pondering what I would do and how I would face these events unfolding before my eyes. The reality that I find incomprehensible and confounding, I present it exactly to you how I encounter it myself. That’s the approach I take to moviemaking." — Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Ingmar Bergman: No other art-medium—neither painting nor poetry—can communicate the specific quality of the dream as well as the film can. When the lights go down in the cinema and this white shining point opens up for us, our gaze stops flitting hither and thither, settles and becomes quite steady. We just sit there, letting the images flow out over us. Our will ceases to function. We lose our ability to sort things out and fix them in their proper places. We’re drawn into a course of events—we’re participants in a dream… Sometimes while I’m dreaming I think: “I’ll remember this, I’ll make a film of it”—it’s a sort of occupational disease.

Luis Buñuel: If someone were to tell me I had twenty years left, and ask me how I’d like to spend them, I’d reply: “Give me two hours a day of activity, and I’ll take the other twenty-two in dreams… provided I can remember them.”

"Wow! That was intense!"
"Repo man’s always intense."

Repo Man — dir. Alex Cox