"I know that Africa is immensely rich in cinematic potential. It is good for the future of cinema that Africa exists. Cinema was born in Africa, because the image itself was born in Africa. The instruments, yes, are European, but the creative necessity and rationale exist in our oral tradition. As I said to the children before, in order to make a film, you must only close your eyes and see the images. Open your eyes, and the film is there. I want these children to understand that Africa is a land of images, not only because images of African masks revolutionized art throughout the world but as a result, simply and paradoxically, of oral tradition. Oral tradition is a tradition of images. What is said is stronger than what is written; the word addresses itself to the imagination, not the ear. Imagination creates the image and the image creates cinema, so we are in direct lineage as cinema’s parents." — Djibril Diop Mambéty

"I know that Africa is immensely rich in cinematic potential. It is good for the future of cinema that Africa exists. Cinema was born in Africa, because the image itself was born in Africa. The instruments, yes, are European, but the creative necessity and rationale exist in our oral tradition. As I said to the children before, in order to make a film, you must only close your eyes and see the images. Open your eyes, and the film is there. I want these children to understand that Africa is a land of images, not only because images of African masks revolutionized art throughout the world but as a result, simply and paradoxically, of oral tradition. Oral tradition is a tradition of images. What is said is stronger than what is written; the word addresses itself to the imagination, not the ear. Imagination creates the image and the image creates cinema, so we are in direct lineage as cinema’s parents." — Djibril Diop Mambéty

"[Food] is one of my persistent obsessions that had its source in my childhood. I was a child who did not want to eat. My parents were desperate. They would pour fish oil, fortified wine and various other liquids into me to enhance the taste of food, and they would send me to ‘fattening’ camps and other such places. I ended up so weakened and bony that I could not stand and my mum had to push me in a wheelchair. I was not even accepted in school. Besides, a chewing mouth is quite a fitting symbol of this aggressive, all-devouring civilization." [x]

"Food is perhaps the most apt symbol of our civilization because in its insatiable aggression, our civilization consumes everything around us: nature, animals, whole ethnic groups, cultures… everything gets digested in its utilitarian maw only to be excreted as money—the excrement of our times. Just like a small child our civilization considers its excrements to be the most valuable product it managed to squeeze out, and uses it to reward its favorites." [x]

Jan Švankmajer on the recurrent theme of food in his films.


[Veronika Voss] was your fortieth film. I have the feeling many people see you as a hamster in an exercise wheel, constantly under pressure to produce. Do you see it that way, too?
Well, there are two factors here. First, I don’t work more than other people, more than someone stamping out cans in a factory, or the like. I just work all year long; I don’t take as many vacations as the others in the industry. That’s one side of it. The other side is that I really have a drive that’s hard to explain—it makes me have to do things, and I’m actually only happy when I’m doing things, and that’s my drug, if you will… When I was very small I already knew I was supposed to make many films. I can only tell you that when I shot my first take it was more fantastic than the most fantastic orgasm I ever had. That was a feeling, indescribable.
Rainer Werner FassbinderMay 31, 1945 — June 10, 1982

[Veronika Voss] was your fortieth film. I have the feeling many people see you as a hamster in an exercise wheel, constantly under pressure to produce. Do you see it that way, too?

Well, there are two factors here. First, I don’t work more than other people, more than someone stamping out cans in a factory, or the like. I just work all year long; I don’t take as many vacations as the others in the industry. That’s one side of it. The other side is that I really have a drive that’s hard to explain—it makes me have to do things, and I’m actually only happy when I’m doing things, and that’s my drug, if you will… When I was very small I already knew I was supposed to make many films. I can only tell you that when I shot my first take it was more fantastic than the most fantastic orgasm I ever had. That was a feeling, indescribable.

Rainer Werner Fassbinder
May 31, 1945 — June 10, 1982


Your approach to filmmaking is very personal, do you worry how audiences will connect to the work?
Naomi Kawase: Instead of being stopped by the fear of not being understood what is more important to me is the act of making the film and the hope that the people watching the film will understand the strong will with which I make the film. So I overcome this fear by doing it and believing that my wish to reach the audience will be fulfilled.

Your approach to filmmaking is very personal, do you worry how audiences will connect to the work?

Naomi Kawase: Instead of being stopped by the fear of not being understood what is more important to me is the act of making the film and the hope that the people watching the film will understand the strong will with which I make the film. So I overcome this fear by doing it and believing that my wish to reach the audience will be fulfilled.

The only film ever directed by author/poet/playwright/activist Jean Genet, 1950s legendary Un chant d’amour was long suppressed by censors for its explicit homosexual content. In 1964, filmmaker Jonas Mekas was arrested on obscenity charges after a screening of the film alongside Jack Smith’s Flaming Creatures. Mekas recalls how he smuggled the film into the U.S. in the first place:

"The film was in 35mm and it was bulky. I was afraid that if I went from Paris to New York the film would be confiscated. Customs was very strict. Twice when I came to New York from Paris I had some Olympia publications in my pocket and they were seized. So I said, ‘If I go to New York with this, I have no chance. I have to go first to London.’ And that’s what I did. I cut the film into three pieces and put them in my raincoat pockets, and went to London. When you come from Paris, [US] Customs says, ‘Oh, Paris, hum, Paris.’ If you come from London, well that’s more conservative and you have a chance to pass through.

"I was on the plane to New York from London and I was talking with my neighbor, who happened to be the playwright [Harold] Pinter. When I told him what I had in my pockets, he said, ‘Maybe you should let me go first. You come after me.’ So I followed him and we got to Customs and they opened Pinter’s suitcase. It was full of plays, copies of the same play. They said, ‘What’s this?’ ‘Oh, it’s my play’, he said. ‘It’s opening on Broadway.’ ‘Play! On Broadway!’ The Customs man got so gaga, so excited, that he motioned his neighbors [fellow officers]. They all converged and were so yapping with excitement that I just passed through. And that’s how the film got in the country. If I had been by myself, I don’t know what would have happened. So, thanks Pinter!"


2014 Cannes Film Festival Winners
Palme d’OrWinter Sleep — dir. Nuri Bilge Ceylan
Grand PrixThe Wonders — dir. Alice Rohrwacher
Best DirectorBennett Miller — Foxcatcher
Jury PrizeMommy — dir. Xavier DolanAdieu au Language — dir. Jean-Luc Godard
Best ScreenplayAndrey Zvyagintsev and Oleg Negin for Leviathan
Best ActressJulianne Moore for Maps to the Stars
Best ActorTimothy Spall for Mr. Turner
Camera d’OrParty Girl — dir. Marie Amachoukeli, Claire Burger, Samuel Theis

2014 Cannes Film Festival Winners

Palme d’Or
Winter Sleep — dir. Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Grand Prix
The Wonders — dir. Alice Rohrwacher

Best Director
Bennett Miller — Foxcatcher

Jury Prize
Mommy — dir. Xavier Dolan
Adieu au Language — dir. Jean-Luc Godard

Best Screenplay
Andrey Zvyagintsev and Oleg Negin for Leviathan

Best Actress
Julianne Moore for Maps to the Stars

Best Actor
Timothy Spall for Mr. Turner

Camera d’Or
Party Girl — dir. Marie Amachoukeli, Claire Burger, Samuel Theis

Rainer Werner Fassbinder on the set of his film Veronika Voss. The film premiered in February 1982 and four months later, during the final stages of post-production on Querelle, Fassbinder died of an accidental drug overdose, the notes for his next film at his side.

Kenji Mizoguchi with actress Ayako Wakao, cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa, and screenwriter Yoshikata Yoda during the production of the 1953 film Gion Bayashi.

Behind the scenes of Powell & Pressburger’s The Red Shoes.

City of Pirates — dir. Raúl Ruiz