"I am hopelessly in love with this man. Completely. Because, I don’t know why, I have met him a few times and… I love his work and I love him as a person, if he is a person, which I doubt, because he has no limits; he’s just like quicksilver—all over the place. I have never seen anybody like that before. He is enormously intuitive. He is intuitive; he is creative; he is an enormous force. He is burning inside with such heat. Collapsing. Do you understand what I mean? The heat from his creative mind, it melts him. He suffers from it; he suffers physically from it. One day when he can manage this heat and can set it free, I think he will make pictures you have never seen in your life." — Ingmar Bergman
"He had individual style. There are things you cannot take a course in. You are born with it. He was a first-class clown, with a unique, great concept. In life, when you were with Fellini, you always knew you weren’t with anyone else. He was in his own orbit. When someone like Fellini dies, there is no way to pass on a formula, because there is no formula. What he did came out of the person, out of him. People will study and analyze and copy, and maybe someone will achieve to the point it is said of him, ‘His film is like Fellini.’ But it can only be like Fellini. When you can’t pass it on, it’s the real stuff.” — Billy Wilder

"I am hopelessly in love with this man. Completely. Because, I don’t know why, I have met him a few times and… I love his work and I love him as a person, if he is a person, which I doubt, because he has no limits; he’s just like quicksilver—all over the place. I have never seen anybody like that before. He is enormously intuitive. He is intuitive; he is creative; he is an enormous force. He is burning inside with such heat. Collapsing. Do you understand what I mean? The heat from his creative mind, it melts him. He suffers from it; he suffers physically from it. One day when he can manage this heat and can set it free, I think he will make pictures you have never seen in your life." — Ingmar Bergman

"He had individual style. There are things you cannot take a course in. You are born with it. He was a first-class clown, with a unique, great concept. In life, when you were with Fellini, you always knew you weren’t with anyone else. He was in his own orbit. When someone like Fellini dies, there is no way to pass on a formula, because there is no formula. What he did came out of the person, out of him. People will study and analyze and copy, and maybe someone will achieve to the point it is said of him, ‘His film is like Fellini.’ But it can only be like Fellini. When you can’t pass it on, it’s the real stuff.” — Billy Wilder

Double Indemnity — dir. Billy Wilder


"I love to shoot elegantly and I pride myself that it’s not whacked together by a dilettante. But I despise doing fancy schmancy shots. I cannot stand it. If anybody in the middle of a picture suddenly grabs his partner’s knee and says, ‘Oooooh, look at that setup!’ then the picture is dead to me because he knows that there was a setup. He knows there was a camera, he knows there were people on the dolly pushing backward, forward. I try to involve the audience and make them part of what is happening on that two-dimensional screen. The key is just make it effective, but don’t make it obvious. Make it clear to them, but don’t spell it out like the audience are just a bunch of idiots. Just aim it slightly above their station and they’re going to get it."
Billy WilderJune 22, 1906 — March 27, 2002

"I love to shoot elegantly and I pride myself that it’s not whacked together by a dilettante. But I despise doing fancy schmancy shots. I cannot stand it. If anybody in the middle of a picture suddenly grabs his partner’s knee and says, ‘Oooooh, look at that setup!’ then the picture is dead to me because he knows that there was a setup. He knows there was a camera, he knows there were people on the dolly pushing backward, forward. I try to involve the audience and make them part of what is happening on that two-dimensional screen. The key is just make it effective, but don’t make it obvious. Make it clear to them, but don’t spell it out like the audience are just a bunch of idiots. Just aim it slightly above their station and they’re going to get it."

Billy Wilder
June 22, 1906 — March 27, 2002




















What did Some Like It Hot look like the first time you saw it edited together?BILLY WILDER: Any first cut of the picture makes you feel suicidal. It’s just the worst moment of your life. Every picture, you say, “Oh my God.” Because you’ve worked, you’ve slaved, this is a year and a half of your life, and then you look and there it is, an hour and fifty-five minutes, and you say, “Is that all there is? For that, a year and a half? My God.” But then you start cutting, and a little music comes in and then you kind of polish it, and it’s just like night and day. And it’s all worth it. When you preview a picture that really works, you feel that you’ve got the audience by the throat. It’s not very often. That’s why I say when you’ve got them by the throat, don’t let go. Just squeeze harder and get them in the gut and stamp on them because they are such bastards. They fight you; they come in and say, “I don’t want to like it. I hope that son of a bitch falls on his face.” And you don’t want to let them go because you suddenly sense “I’ve got them,” whether it’s a dramatic scene or the laughter has started. Once you get them into a mood of “Hey, this is funny,” then you can say anything.

What did Some Like It Hot look like the first time you saw it edited together?
BILLY WILDER: Any first cut of the picture makes you feel suicidal. It’s just the worst moment of your life. Every picture, you say, “Oh my God.” Because you’ve worked, you’ve slaved, this is a year and a half of your life, and then you look and there it is, an hour and fifty-five minutes, and you say, “Is that all there is? For that, a year and a half? My God.” But then you start cutting, and a little music comes in and then you kind of polish it, and it’s just like night and day. And it’s all worth it. When you preview a picture that really works, you feel that you’ve got the audience by the throat. It’s not very often. That’s why I say when you’ve got them by the throat, don’t let go. Just squeeze harder and get them in the gut and stamp on them because they are such bastards. They fight you; they come in and say, “I don’t want to like it. I hope that son of a bitch falls on his face.” And you don’t want to let them go because you suddenly sense “I’ve got them,” whether it’s a dramatic scene or the laughter has started. Once you get them into a mood of “Hey, this is funny,” then you can say anything.

Billy WilderFilm

"I always say Fellini inspired me. I love being in Fellini’s worlds. And Billy Wilder and Stanley Kubrick and Alfred Hitchcock. To revisit those certain films and go in that world is just—It’s a world that didn’t exist and now it exists. There are some people that are—I always say that they don’t like so much abstraction. They don’t like to feel lost. They like to know always, always, always what’s going on. And when they don’t feel that, they feel a little crazy. And they don’t like that. Other people—and I’m one of them—I love to go into a world, be taken into a world and get lost in there and feel-think my way and have these experiences that I know… I know that feeling, but I don’t know how to put it into words. I know that feeling and it’s magical that this cinema brought it out. This is what I love." — David Lynch

"I always say Fellini inspired me. I love being in Fellini’s worlds. And Billy Wilder and Stanley Kubrick and Alfred Hitchcock. To revisit those certain films and go in that world is just—It’s a world that didn’t exist and now it exists. There are some people that are—I always say that they don’t like so much abstraction. They don’t like to feel lost. They like to know always, always, always what’s going on. And when they don’t feel that, they feel a little crazy. And they don’t like that. Other people—and I’m one of them—I love to go into a world, be taken into a world and get lost in there and feel-think my way and have these experiences that I know… I know that feeling, but I don’t know how to put it into words. I know that feeling and it’s magical that this cinema brought it out. This is what I love." — David Lynch

On November 20th, 1972, George Cukor hosted a lunch in honor of Luis Buñuel. Attendees included Robert Mulligan, William Wyler, Robert Wise, Jean-Claude Carriere, Serge Silberman, Billy Wilder, George Stevens, Alfred Hitchcock, Rouben Mamoulian, John Ford, and Rafael Buñuel.

Film Posters by Saul Bass

Part Two: 1958 - 1963
The Big Country | Vertigo | Anatomy of a Murder | Exodus | Spartacus | The Magnificent Seven | One Two Three | Advise & Consent | Nine Hours to Rama

hanupanupa:

Sunset Boulevard, 1950 

hanupanupa:

Sunset Boulevard, 1950 

05 / 03 / 2012 49   originally from mabellonghetti   via hanupanupa

Billy Wilder, an Academy Award-winning film director stands atop the wing of an old-fashioned barnstorming bi-plane flying over in Costa Mesa, California, March 28, 1956 to win a $50 bet from producer Leland Hayward. In discussing the hazards of the stunt, which is part of the flying circus sequence in “The Spirit of St. Louis,” Wilder bet he could do it and Hayward bet he wouldn’t. Hayward lost, and Wilder said he was sending his winnings to the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund. (AP Photo)

Billy Wilder, an Academy Award-winning film director stands atop the wing of an old-fashioned barnstorming bi-plane flying over in Costa Mesa, California, March 28, 1956 to win a $50 bet from producer Leland Hayward. In discussing the hazards of the stunt, which is part of the flying circus sequence in “The Spirit of St. Louis,” Wilder bet he could do it and Hayward bet he wouldn’t. Hayward lost, and Wilder said he was sending his winnings to the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund. (AP Photo)

Billy WilderFilm
Billy Wilder and Michelangelo Antonioni. Cannes 1982.

Billy Wilder and Michelangelo Antonioni. Cannes 1982.