"In Hong Kong in the ’60s, going to cinema was a big thing. We have cinemas for Hollywood films, local productions, European cinema, but there was no [label of] art film at that time. Even Fellini was treated as a commercial film. So as a kid, I spent a lot of time with my mother in the cinemas. And we didn’t know which is an art film, which is a commercial film; we just liked to watch the cinema. […] I’m not coming from film school, I learned cinema in the cinema watching films, so you always have a curiosity. I say, well, what if I make a film in this genre? What if I make this film like this? It’s always like curiosities and drive, like, let’s try to do this one this time." — Wong Kar-wai

I think I have done about 10 films that have shot within one minute or five minutes of where I live in Hong Kong. That is why I can’t leave, that is why I have to stay there. Chungking Express is actually shot in my apartment. […] The bloody film was shot in my bloody apartment! (laughs) I should’ve stayed in a hotel. I’d be working all day and sleeping on the floor at night. We couldn’t mess up the set. The film’s very special in that way given the connection to my personal life…

The interesting thing is after the film—I guess it was the Hong Kong tourist board put out a map of film locations—for three of four years there’d be people following this map to my door. Especially Japanese tourists for some reason. They’d go on the escalator and look for the apartment. So, I’d be going off to work or to a bar and there’d be people waiting downstairs. Once I found kids literally on my doorstep wanting to go in.

Christopher Doyle

The Films of Wong Kar-wai

As Tears Go By | Days of Being Wild | Chungking Express | Ashes of Time | Fallen Angels | Happy Together | In the Mood for Love | 2046 | My Blueberry Nights | The Grandmasters

Chungking Express // dir. Wong Kar-wai

Chungking Express // dir. Wong Kar-wai

Chungking Express // Wong Kar-Wai

Chungking Express // Wong Kar-Wai