The Last of England — dir. Derek Jarman


Derek JarmanJanuary 31, 1942 — February 19, 1994
"I have always wholeheartedly treasured in your work the whiff of the school play. It tickles me still and I miss it terribly. […] The antidote it offers to the mirrorball of the marketable—the artful without the art, the meaningful devoid of meaning—is meat and drink to so many of us looking for that dodgy wig, that moment of awkward zing, that loose corner: where we might prize up the carpet and uncover the rich slates of something we might recognize as spirit underneath. Something raw and dusty and inarticulate, for heaven’s sake. This is what Pasolini knew. What Rossellini knew. What Abbas Kiarostami knows. This is also what Ken Loach knows. What Andrew Kotting knows. What Bill Douglas knew. What Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, what William Blake knew. And, for that matter, what Caravaggio knew, painting prostitutes as Madonnas and rent boys as saints; no—Madonnas as prostitutes and saints as rent boys… there’s the rub. It’s all about rhythm: it’s all in the knees. Bring it from home. Bring it out from under your bed. Your own bed. Your own life. That’s—eventually—what you did, Derek, and measures your highest contribution as an artist, in my opinion: that you made your work out of the soup kitchen that was your life." — Tilda Swinton: In the Spirit of Derek Jarman

Derek Jarman
January 31, 1942 — February 19, 1994

"I have always wholeheartedly treasured in your work the whiff of the school play. It tickles me still and I miss it terribly. […] The antidote it offers to the mirrorball of the marketable—the artful without the art, the meaningful devoid of meaning—is meat and drink to so many of us looking for that dodgy wig, that moment of awkward zing, that loose corner: where we might prize up the carpet and uncover the rich slates of something we might recognize as spirit underneath. Something raw and dusty and inarticulate, for heaven’s sake. This is what Pasolini knew. What Rossellini knew. What Abbas Kiarostami knows. This is also what Ken Loach knows. What Andrew Kotting knows. What Bill Douglas knew. What Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, what William Blake knew. And, for that matter, what Caravaggio knew, painting prostitutes as Madonnas and rent boys as saints; no—Madonnas as prostitutes and saints as rent boys… there’s the rub. It’s all about rhythm: it’s all in the knees. Bring it from home. Bring it out from under your bed. Your own bed. Your own life. That’s—eventually—what you did, Derek, and measures your highest contribution as an artist, in my opinion: that you made your work out of the soup kitchen that was your life." — Tilda Swinton: In the Spirit of Derek Jarman

Derek JarmanFilmIcons
Tilda Swinton in Derek Jarman’s The Last of England

Tilda Swinton in Derek Jarman’s The Last of England