"Orson Welles is a kind of giant with the look of a child, a tree filled with birds and shadow, a dog that has broken its chain and lies down in the flower beds, an active idler, a wise madman, an island surrounded by people, a pupil asleep in class, a strategist who pretends to be drunk when he wants to be left in peace. He knows better than anyone how to use the apparent nonchalance of true strength to give an impression of drifting, and advances with a half-open eye. The derelict manner he sometimes affects, like some dozing bear, shields him from the cold, restless whirl of the film world. A method that made him pack his bags, leave Hollywood and allow himself to be drawn toward other company and other prospects." — Jean Cocteau

"Orson Welles is a kind of giant with the look of a child, a tree filled with birds and shadow, a dog that has broken its chain and lies down in the flower beds, an active idler, a wise madman, an island surrounded by people, a pupil asleep in class, a strategist who pretends to be drunk when he wants to be left in peace. He knows better than anyone how to use the apparent nonchalance of true strength to give an impression of drifting, and advances with a half-open eye. The derelict manner he sometimes affects, like some dozing bear, shields him from the cold, restless whirl of the film world. A method that made him pack his bags, leave Hollywood and allow himself to be drawn toward other company and other prospects." — Jean Cocteau

Orson WellesFilmIcons

I think I have done about 10 films that have shot within one minute or five minutes of where I live in Hong Kong. That is why I can’t leave, that is why I have to stay there. Chungking Express is actually shot in my apartment. […] The bloody film was shot in my bloody apartment! (laughs) I should’ve stayed in a hotel. I’d be working all day and sleeping on the floor at night. We couldn’t mess up the set. The film’s very special in that way given the connection to my personal life…

The interesting thing is after the film—I guess it was the Hong Kong tourist board put out a map of film locations—for three of four years there’d be people following this map to my door. Especially Japanese tourists for some reason. They’d go on the escalator and look for the apartment. So, I’d be going off to work or to a bar and there’d be people waiting downstairs. Once I found kids literally on my doorstep wanting to go in.

Christopher Doyle


"I think our purpose as filmmakers or as storytellers or whatever you’re going to call us is to say that at this particular point with this relationship, with this social structure, in this political climate, this is the best film I could do. I think that’s all we can do. Then we’re not exploitative, we’re not the Spielbergs or the whatever. Then it becomes extremely personal, for better or worse. So don’t get confused by digital or non-digital or money or not—just do the best fucking film you can with your abilities at that time. I mean, why else do we make films when we could have gone into real estate?"
Christopher DoyleBorn May 2, 1952

"I think our purpose as filmmakers or as storytellers or whatever you’re going to call us is to say that at this particular point with this relationship, with this social structure, in this political climate, this is the best film I could do. I think that’s all we can do. Then we’re not exploitative, we’re not the Spielbergs or the whatever. Then it becomes extremely personal, for better or worse. So don’t get confused by digital or non-digital or money or not—just do the best fucking film you can with your abilities at that time. I mean, why else do we make films when we could have gone into real estate?"

Christopher Doyle
Born May 2, 1952


"I sit with my editor at every stage of the cutting. I feel editing to be one of the most vital and exciting aspects of filmmaking. Although my films are largely cut in the camera, there is still a lot of room left for refinements, especially in scenes of dialogue involving cutting back and forth between actors. Often a scene like this would be cut and re-cut several times until a final, satisfactory form has been achieved. Even after twenty-five years of filmmaking, I can truthfully say that I learn something new about the nature of cinema every time I cut a film with my editor." — Satyajit Ray

"I sit with my editor at every stage of the cutting. I feel editing to be one of the most vital and exciting aspects of filmmaking. Although my films are largely cut in the camera, there is still a lot of room left for refinements, especially in scenes of dialogue involving cutting back and forth between actors. Often a scene like this would be cut and re-cut several times until a final, satisfactory form has been achieved. Even after twenty-five years of filmmaking, I can truthfully say that I learn something new about the nature of cinema every time I cut a film with my editor." — Satyajit Ray

Satyajit RayFilm

Gus Van Sant paying homage to The Third Man in Mala Noche.


"If you ask me, not so much cinematically but critically, or even conceptually, and very much emotionally, I don’t think of my films as ‘truth-giving.’ I think about the process of making an image that draws identification, and not a question of identity. And identification is humane, it’s universal. It’s you, wherever you are, in close proximity to a certain intimate space. This is what cinema is, and this is why it can have that power of transgressing borders and checkpoints and walls. And that wall is wherever it is; it’s not just the wall in Ramallah." — Elia Suleiman

"If you ask me, not so much cinematically but critically, or even conceptually, and very much emotionally, I don’t think of my films as ‘truth-giving.’ I think about the process of making an image that draws identification, and not a question of identity. And identification is humane, it’s universal. It’s you, wherever you are, in close proximity to a certain intimate space. This is what cinema is, and this is why it can have that power of transgressing borders and checkpoints and walls. And that wall is wherever it is; it’s not just the wall in Ramallah." — Elia Suleiman

Five Portraits by Yasujiro Ozu
1941 — The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family
1942 — There Was a Father
1947 — Record of a Tenement Gentleman
1951 — Early Summer
1960 — Late Autumn

The Devils // dir. Ken Russell


"All filmmakers are searching for Cinema and discover it partially. Vigo is Cinema incarnate in one man." — Henri Langlois on Jean Vigo

"All filmmakers are searching for Cinema and discover it partially. Vigo is Cinema incarnate in one man." — Henri Langlois on Jean Vigo

Jean VigoFilmIcons

"I suppose I am interested in the variety of human life—how people live. I am most interested in individuals and how they respond to challenges or to difficulties, or just to each other. I am curious about people. So that’s why I do a lot of different things. The cinema should be human and be part of people’s lives; it should focus on ordinary existences in sometimes extraordinary situations and places. That is what really motivates me."
Claire DenisBorn April 21, 1948

"I suppose I am interested in the variety of human life—how people live. I am most interested in individuals and how they respond to challenges or to difficulties, or just to each other. I am curious about people. So that’s why I do a lot of different things. The cinema should be human and be part of people’s lives; it should focus on ordinary existences in sometimes extraordinary situations and places. That is what really motivates me."

Claire Denis
Born April 21, 1948

Claire DenisFilmIcons