"Glauber Rocha I met over the years, then I started making films—there’s no doubt Antonio das Mortes had a major impact on Mean Streets and on Raging Bull. On Raging Bull we put in some Brazilian music in homage to Glauber, there’s a couple of pieces of music in there. In any event, I think the last time I saw him was in Venice, 1980. But before that, Tom Luddy brought him over—I had a small house in Los Angeles—and we had a dinner. It was Tom Luddy, myself, and Glauber, and I showed him The Big Shave, a short I had made. And we looked at a John Ford film, The Horse Soldiers; not a great John Ford film, but he liked Ford and he liked westerns he told me.”
"[On his favorite of Rocha’s films…] I think it’s Antonio, but I go back and forth. There’s Land in Anguish and Barravento, but Antonio is very much the one I keep checking back with, I keep showing to people—if I think they deserve it. Because sometimes some people are gone, some people are like zombies. They have no more feeling or something, I don’t know, and I think it’s good to show it to people who will… you know it might help them in their work. Even if they reject it, it’s something for them to have a reaction to, rather than what’s being presented today. But, no, I think it’s Antonio, I go back and forth, but the music is always in my head and I know it very well. It’s fresh, it’s new. It doesn’t cater to tastes of the box office, I mean the box office in a bad way, you know, of a traditional, ‘OK, now we’re going to sit you down and tell you a nice story.’ This punches you in the face and wakes you up, it opens your eyes. And that’s what you need today, more than ever.” — Martin Scorsese on Glauber Rocha

"Glauber Rocha I met over the years, then I started making films—there’s no doubt Antonio das Mortes had a major impact on Mean Streets and on Raging Bull. On Raging Bull we put in some Brazilian music in homage to Glauber, there’s a couple of pieces of music in there. In any event, I think the last time I saw him was in Venice, 1980. But before that, Tom Luddy brought him over—I had a small house in Los Angeles—and we had a dinner. It was Tom Luddy, myself, and Glauber, and I showed him The Big Shave, a short I had made. And we looked at a John Ford film, The Horse Soldiers; not a great John Ford film, but he liked Ford and he liked westerns he told me.”

"[On his favorite of Rocha’s films…] I think it’s Antonio, but I go back and forth. There’s Land in Anguish and Barravento, but Antonio is very much the one I keep checking back with, I keep showing to people—if I think they deserve it. Because sometimes some people are gone, some people are like zombies. They have no more feeling or something, I don’t know, and I think it’s good to show it to people who will… you know it might help them in their work. Even if they reject it, it’s something for them to have a reaction to, rather than what’s being presented today. But, no, I think it’s Antonio, I go back and forth, but the music is always in my head and I know it very well. It’s fresh, it’s new. It doesn’t cater to tastes of the box office, I mean the box office in a bad way, you know, of a traditional, ‘OK, now we’re going to sit you down and tell you a nice story.’ This punches you in the face and wakes you up, it opens your eyes. And that’s what you need today, more than ever.” — Martin Scorsese on Glauber Rocha

Filmmakers photographed by Xavier Lambours.

Taxi Driver // dir. Martin Scorsese

Taxi Driver // dir. Martin Scorsese

De Niro and Scorsese on the set of Taxi Driver

De Niro and Scorsese on the set of Taxi Driver