"After Thieves Like Us, I was finally taken seriously. Robert Altman told me: You’re not just instinctual, you are an actress, a very good actress… That was a very, very emotional moment for me. I guess it gave me the confidence to think I could go out and work for other directors as well… If I had listened to everyone who told me no, I’d never have gotten anything accomplished. When I really believe in something and someone says, ‘You can’t do it,’ it just spurs me on… Life is all about movement, and when you stop moving, you’re dead! That’s my big philosophy—it’s all about motion. Life can change in the blinking of an eye, so you just have to appreciate every minute and keep going.” — Shelley Duvall

"It’s amazing how fast you get used to such a big place. I tell you, when we first came up here I thought it was kinda scary."


In previous films, you have worked within the conventions of specific genres (science-fiction, thriller, war film, etc.). Were you attracted to The Shining because it gave you the opportunity to explore the laws of a new genre in your career?
Stanley Kubrick: About the only law that I think relates to the genre is that you should not try to explain, to find neat explanations for what happens, and that the object of the thing is to produce a sense of the uncanny. Freud in his essay on the uncanny wrote that the sense of the uncanny is the only emotion which is more powerfully expressed in art than in life, which I found very illuminating; it didn’t help writing the screenplay, but I think it’s an interesting insight into the genre. And I read an essay by the great master H.P. Lovecraft where he said that you should never attempt to explain what happens, as long as what happens stimulates people’s imagination, their sense of the uncanny, their sense of anxiety and fear. And as long as it doesn’t, within itself, have any obvious inner contradictions, it is just a matter of, as it were, building on the imagination (imaginary ideas, surprises, etc.), working in this area of feeling. I think also that the ingeniousness of a story like this is something which the audience ultimately enjoy; they obviously wonder as the story goes on what’s going to happen, and there’s a great satisfaction when it’s all over not having been able to have anticipated the major developments of the story, and yet at the end not to feel that you have been fooled or swindled.

In previous films, you have worked within the conventions of specific genres (science-fiction, thriller, war film, etc.). Were you attracted to The Shining because it gave you the opportunity to explore the laws of a new genre in your career?

Stanley Kubrick: About the only law that I think relates to the genre is that you should not try to explain, to find neat explanations for what happens, and that the object of the thing is to produce a sense of the uncanny. Freud in his essay on the uncanny wrote that the sense of the uncanny is the only emotion which is more powerfully expressed in art than in life, which I found very illuminating; it didn’t help writing the screenplay, but I think it’s an interesting insight into the genre. And I read an essay by the great master H.P. Lovecraft where he said that you should never attempt to explain what happens, as long as what happens stimulates people’s imagination, their sense of the uncanny, their sense of anxiety and fear. And as long as it doesn’t, within itself, have any obvious inner contradictions, it is just a matter of, as it were, building on the imagination (imaginary ideas, surprises, etc.), working in this area of feeling. I think also that the ingeniousness of a story like this is something which the audience ultimately enjoy; they obviously wonder as the story goes on what’s going to happen, and there’s a great satisfaction when it’s all over not having been able to have anticipated the major developments of the story, and yet at the end not to feel that you have been fooled or swindled.

On the set of The Shining.

"The supernatural cannot be taken apart and analyzed too closely. The ultimate test of its rationale is whether it is good enough to raise the hairs on the back of your neck."

"The lasting and ultimately most important reputation of a film is not based on reviews, but on what, if anything, people say about it over the years, and on how much affection for it they have."

Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999)

Film Posters by Saul Bass

Part Four: 1968 - 1993
Why Man Creates | Such Good Friends | Rosebud | The Double McGuffin | The Human Factor | The Shining  | The Solar Film | Return from the River Kwai | Schindler’s List

criterioncast:

“A synchronized collage of every zoom in Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror masterpiece, The Shining.”

Via The Playlist

04 / 21 / 2012 140   originally from criterioncast   via criterioncast
You are the caretaker. You’ve always been the caretaker.

You are the caretaker. You’ve always been the caretaker.

On the set of The Shining

On the set of The Shining